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Habitat for Humanity’s Most Famous Volunteer

Happy President’s Day to former U.S. President Jimmy Carter 

In celebration of President’s Day, we’d like to acknowledge the 39th President of the United States, Jimmy Carter. James (Jimmy) Earl Carter, Jr., has always had a voice for affordable, decent housing for all.  

In March of 1984, President Carter resonated with Habitat’s mission of helping families achieve their dream of homeownership when he jogged by the New York City Habitat build and thought to himself, “Rosalynn and I should come up and give them a hand.” 

 

His Deep Commitment and Value Alignment 

President Carter and Mrs. Carter realized Habitat’s mission aligned with their values – they understood the need for families to have a stable, affordable foundation to grow. With this, President and Mrs. Carter formed a partnership with Habitat for Humanity and have been building to improve homes through the Jimmy & Rosalyn Carter Work Project. 

Although Carter is most known in the world for his notable accomplishments as the President of the United States, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, the Governor of Georgia, and more, in Habitat’s world, President Carter is known as our most famous volunteer.  

Over the course of 30 years, President Carter has inspired millions of people in 14 countries while working alongside more than 104,000 Habitat volunteers to build, renovate and repair 4,390 homes.  

“We have the ambition to share some of our good fortune with others,” Carter says. 

 “That’s one of the most difficult things in life: to cross that chasm between well-off people and families that don’t have a decent home. That’s one of the things Habitat has given to us: an ability to share, side by side, building a home with families that have never had a decent place to live.” 

A fact of Carter’s commitment

Carter suffered a fall in his Georgia home that led to 14 stitches and a visibly black eye. Despite his injuries, he traveled to Nashville to help rally volunteers during the 36th Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Work Project with Habitat for Humanity. 

We are honored and grateful for President Carter and Mrs. Carter’s continued partnership and support. You can add to their mission of life-changing work by volunteering, donating, or shopping at San Gabriel Valley Habitat ReStores. 

The Impact of a Community Like Builders’ Club

Learn why our Builders’ Club members give monthly to make a difference all year round 

When like-minded givers come together to support affordable housing with their monthly donation, a community is born. The Builders’ Club community is a passionate and determined group of monthly givers on a mission to end the housing crisis in the San Gabriel Valley region. 

Thank you to our Builders’ Club members who have committed to make a difference all year round. You’ve put your name alongside other members who believe affordable housing should be available for everyone.  

You know with every monthly donation you are: 

  • Helping us build and repair more homes 
  • Altering the trajectory of families’ lives 
  • Improving the health and wellness of families 
  • Doubling the chances of family members attending college 
  • And more! 

Meet some current Builders’ Club members and learn why they give monthly. 

Donor Feature: Nick 

“As a SoCal resident, I can’t imagine living through COVID in an overcrowded, overpriced, and unsafe apartment. Donating $10 every month seems like a small sacrifice if it allows a family to experience the safety and security of becoming homeowners. I am proud to be a member of Builders’ Club!” – Nick

Donor Feature: Kathyjo 

“I am honored to be a member of the Builders’ Club. To work alongside and also be a member teaches my family the importance of giving back. As a family, we annually pick a cause to donate to knowing how fortunate we are to see the results locally in our community. During the current state of affairs we are currently experiencing, we feel helping others and giving back is the right thing to do.” – Kathyjo 

Donor Feature: Anthony 

“I am honored to partner with San Gabriel Valley Habitat for Humanity. The work that this organization does in our community is instrumental. The Builders’ Club is a tangible way for me to show my ongoing support. I am grateful for all those working with this organization, for their dedication to the enduring mission of making affordable housing a reality for all of our brothers and sisters in the San Gabriel Valley.” – Anthony 

Donor Feature: Tammy 

“My monthly donation as a Builders’ Club member is the equivalent of skipping one monthly dinner delivery and it helps families to become homeowners. I’m happy to be a Builders’ Club member!” -Tammy 

Donor Feature: Lucy 

“Donating to families that have the opportunity to receive homes locally is such a blessing to me. I was taught as a small child to give to others and lend a helping hand is a gift from God. It was an easy choice for me to make a monthly commitment to become a Builders’ Club member. I hope by sharing this example, it will encourage other young members to do so as well.” – Lucy

Donor Feature: Scarlet and Bella 

“As a family we collectively pick a nonprofit to donate to. I personally see people that do not have homes and families that do without. When I found out SGV Habitat provides homes for families locally, I knew that supporting our community was the right thing to do.” – Scarlet 

“I donate to SGV Habitat because I like to help children and families. I was so excited to learn that Habitat provides homes for local families, it made my choice to give very easily.” – Bella 

 

This month, we are looking to add more loyal supporters to the club during our 2022 Winter Membership Drive.  

By joining the Builders’ Club during the month of February (depending on your monthly contribution), you can also receive exclusive SGV Habitat branded items, such as a reusable shopping bag, coffee cup or t-shirt! Become a Builders’ Club member with your monthly gift today.  

Your Impact in the First Year of the Expanding the American Dream Campaign

In 2021, you (our partners, donors, supporters, and volunteers) provided homeownership opportunities and critical home repairs to 27 families in the San Gabriel Valley and abroad. This directly impacts the Expanding the American Dream campaign’s goal of transforming the lives of 100 families by 2023. 

The breakdown: 

  • 6 homeownership opportunities provided to local families 
  • 11 critical home repairs for low-income homeowners 
  • 10 homes built internationally   

This could not have been achieved without you. To fund this $28 million campaign, we rely on you (providers and preservers of the American Dream), ReStore purchases and donations, state grants, and mortgage proceeds. This campaign is 100% donor dependent. It is only possible through your generous support year after year. Thank You! 

The Expanding the American Dream campaign is going into its second year in 2022. This campaign is calling attention to the need for affordable housing and raising funds to help families achieve their dreams of homeownership. Running through 2023, it highlights the importance of community and the significant role a safe home plays in helping families thrive. 

“Our goal is to dramatically increase the number of affordable homeownership opportunities in the San Gabriel Valley” says Bryan Wong, Executive Director at SGV Habitat for Humanity. “The need for affordable housing in the area is overwhelming. We aim to make the world a place where all can afford to live—both first-time homebuyers and long-time residents.” 

How You Can Help:

  • Donate to the campaign 
  • Shop at SGV ReStores 
  • Advocate for affordable housing for everyone 
  • Educate yourself on the benefits of affordable housing 
  • Share your support by using the #ExpandingtheAmericanDream hashtag on social media 

Celebrating Habitat History of Hand-Up Model in Honor of MLK Day of Service

Koinonia Farm Koinonia is the Greek word usually translated as “community” or “fellowship.” The farm community emphasizes equality, shared resources, and wise stewardship of land and natural resources.

The story of Habitat for Humanity began at Koinonia Farm, an interracial community farm outside Americus, Georgia, founded in 1942 by farmer and biblical scholar, Clarence Jordan. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Clarence and his fellow Koinonia residents were fiercely committed to the equality of all people and utterly devoted to creating opportunity for all. 

A Rich History 

Built on the idea of partnership housing and born from that vision, we have grown into a global organization driven by a vision of a world where everyone has a decent place to live. As part of this effort, in 1990, a small group of dedicated volunteers with a desire to eliminate substandard housing in our community founded San Gabriel Valley Habitat for Humanity (SGV Habitat). The overwhelming need for housing in our communities has provided SGV Habitat for Humanity with a unique opportunity to change lives in our neighborhoods. In 2021, we made the commitment to serving the housing needs of 100 families over the next three years through the Expanding the American Dream campaign.  

Known for our “hand-up, not a handout” model, Habitat for Humanity homeowners work side-by-side with volunteers and skilled staff to build safe, decent and affordable housing. In addition to new homeownership programs, the organization offers critical home repair services to address safety, accessibility, and deferred maintenance issues to assist low-income homeowners to ensure they can continue to live in a safe and decent home for years to come. 

Homeowner Continues to Impact Her Community 

Billie Shaw, Home Repair recipient

Duarte homeowner, Billie Shaw, was a recent recipient of this program. For 5 years Shaw has been distributing food from a local food bank to homeless encampments in the San Gabriel Valley. While seeking resources to assist the individuals she was feeding she came across Habitat for Humanity, not knowing the blessing we would provide would be for her.   

A few years ago, Shaw’s roof was blown off during a strong windstorm. Without the funds to replace it she suffered from years of water damage, eventually causing portions of the plaster ceilings to collapse. She applied to the critical home repair program and not only was Habitat able to help her put on a new roof, we also painted the house. As part of the repair program Shaw provided a payment she could afford and completed several hours of “sweat-equity” giving back to the organization in the form of volunteer hours. Even though she’s completed her sweat equity she continues to serve the SGV Habitat by spreading the word about our programs and nearby resale store, the ReStore.  

“I just can’t believe this blessing I have received,” said Shaw. “They finished my roof and the next day a huge rainstorm came in. I finally saw the rain outside, but not inside my house. Now I plan to pass it on by telling everyone I can about Habitat for Humanity.” 

Shaw, who served as a nurse at Santa Teresita until the hospital closed and then pursued a career in law enforcement, eventually retiring from the Baldwin Park force, has always been called to serve others. It’s partners like her who embody the essence of Habitat for Humanity’s mission.

How You Can Help 

This coming Monday the US will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day, which under the King Holiday and Service Act, was transformed into a day dedicated to volunteer service in honor of Dr. King’s legacy. It is the only federal holiday observed as a National Day of Service – a “day on, not a day off.” It calls for Americans from all walks of life to work together to provide solutions to our most pressing national problems. Problems like affordable housing. On this day we celebrate people like Billie Shaw who gives unto others, even when she needs assistance. Through financial support, volunteering or adding a voice to support affordable housing, everyone can help families achieve the strength, stability, and self-reliance they need to build better lives for themselves. 

  • Advocate for affordable housing for everyone and read how we continue to build a “Beloved Community” 
  • Educate yourself on the benefits of affordable housing  
  • Help sustain and expand the Healthy Homes initiatives at the federal, state and local levels, including public-private collaborative programs 
  • Strengthen enforcement of fair housing laws, including the Fair Housing Act and other state and local regulations prohibiting racial discrimination in housing markets 
  • Donate now to show your support to fix the housing crisis in the San Gabriel Valley and beyond 

 

Photo credits: Stephen F. Somerstein—Getty Images

The Maxson Street Story

Due to circumstances beyond our control we have postponed the planned dedication for February 12.

We are planning a key ceremony for March – details to be announced soon.

Governor Newsom Signs Legislation to Increase Affordable Housing Supply and Strengthen Accountability, Highlights Comprehensive Strategy to Tackle Housing Crisis

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Governor’s Press Office
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 (916) 445-4571

Governor Newsom has signed 31 affordable housing bills focused on cutting red tape and holding cities accountable for providing their fair share of housing

California Comeback Plan’s $22 billion housing and homelessness investment will lead to the creation of over 84,000 new housing units and exits from homelessness

Governor announces new Housing Accountability Unit at HCD to support local jurisdictions’ efforts to create housing

California Comeback Plan funds new $100 million grant program for low- to moderate-income homeowners to build accessory dwelling units 

Administration has advanced $800 million in new or accelerated funding to build affordable, climate-friendly housing and infrastructure 

 

OAKLAND – Today, Governor Gavin Newsom signed a suite of bills to boost housing production across California, complementing the Governor’s $22 billion housing affordability and homelessness package and ongoing work by the state to spur more housing production, tackle barriers to construction and hold local governments accountable. Taken together, the actions represent a comprehensive housing vision and the state’s commitment to create more affordable housing, faster and cheaper.

“The acute affordability crisis we are experiencing in California was decades in the making, and now we’re taking the necessary steps to fix it,” said Governor Newsom, who signed the legislation at an affordable housing development in Oakland today. “This package of smart, bipartisan legislation boosts housing production in California – more streamlining, more local accountability, more affordability, more density. These bills, plus this year’s historic budget investments in affordable housing, will directly lead to more inclusive neighborhoods across the state. Creating denser housing near jobs, parks and schools is key to meeting our climate goals as well as our affordability goals.”

Since taking office, the Governor has prioritized tackling the housing crisis, signing major legislation to boost housing production, remove barriers to construction of accessory dwelling units and streamline state laws to maximize housing production.

This comprehensive housing vision brings a focus on four key areas: streamlining the building of new homes, breaking down barriers to build more affordable housing, addressing systemic bias by elevating fair housing principles and holding local governments accountable to do their job.

Today’s bill package, combined with four housing bills signed earlier this month, create a robust 31-bill housing package that touches on all four key areas – all complemented by budget investments Governor Newsom included as part of his California Comeback Plan.

Under Governor Newsom, California is pursuing its boldest housing and homelessness budget in state history, with an unprecedented investment of $22 billion to tackle these systemic issues. The funding will lead to the creation of over 84,000 new affordable homes for Californians, including over 44,000 new housing units and treatment beds for people exiting homelessness.

Governor Newsom signs affordable housing legislation in Oakland.

The California Comeback Plan included a $10.3 billion budget investment for affordable housing that will enable the creation of more than 40,000 new affordable homes for low-income Californians. These investments include $850 million for incentivizing infill development and smart growth, $800 million to preserve the state’s affordable housing stock, $100 million to promote affordable homeownership and significant funding to scale up the state’s efforts to create more Accessory Dwelling Units, build more housing on state-owned excess land, and investments in farmworker housing.

The following bills were signed today:

  • AB 68 by Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva (D-Fullerton) – Department of Housing and Community Development: California Statewide Housing Plan: annual reports.
  • AB 215 by Assemblymember David Chiu (D-San Francisco) – Planning and Zoning Law: housing element: violations.
  • AB 345 by Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva (D-Fullerton) – Accessory dwelling units: separate conveyance.
  • AB 447 by Assemblymember Tim Grayson (D-Concord) – California Debt Limit Allocation Committee: income taxes: low-income housing tax credits.
  • AB 491 by Assemblymember Christopher Ward (D-San Diego) – Housing: affordable and market rate units.
  • AB 571 by Assemblymember Chad Mayes (I-Rancho Mirage) – Planning and zoning: density bonuses: affordable housing.
  • AB 602 by Assemblymember Tim Grayson (D-Concord) – Development fees: impact fee nexus study.
  • AB 634 by Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo (D-Los Angeles) – Density Bonus Law: affordability restrictions.
  • AB 721 by Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) – Covenants and restrictions: affordable housing.
  • AB 787 by Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel (D-Encino) – Planning and zoning: housing element: converted affordable housing units.
  • AB 838 by Assemblymember Laura Friedman (D-Glendale) – State Housing Law: enforcement response to complaints.
  • AB 948 by Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) – Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers: disclosures: demographic information: reporting: continuing education.
  • AB 1029 by Assemblymember Kevin Mullin (D-South San Francisco) – Housing elements: prohousing local policies.
  • AB 1043 by Assemblymember Isaac Bryan (D-Los Angeles) – Housing programs: rental housing developments: affordable rent.
  • AB 1095 by Assemblymember Ken Cooley (D-Rancho Cordova) – Affordable rental and owner-occupied housing: equity in state and local programs.
  • AB 1297 by Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) – California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank: public and economic development facilities: housing.
  • AB 1304 by Assemblymember Miguel Santiago (D-Los Angeles) – Affirmatively further fair housing: housing element: inventory of land.
  • AB 1398 by Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) – Planning and zoning: housing element: rezoning of sites: prohousing local policies.
  • AB 1466 by Assemblymember Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento) – Real property: discriminatory restrictions.
  • AB 1584 by the Committee on Housing and Community Development – Housing omnibus.
  • SB 263 by Senator Susan Rubio (D-Baldwin Park) – Real estate applicants and licensees: education requirements: fair housing and implicit bias training.
  • SB 290 by Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) – Density Bonus Law: qualifications for incentives or concessions: student housing for lower income students: moderate-income persons and families: local government constraints.
  • SB 381 by Senator Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) – Surplus residential property: priorities, procedures, price, and fund: City of South Pasadena.
  • SB 478 by Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) – Planning and Zoning Law: housing development projects.
  • SB 591 by Senator Josh Becker (D-Menlo Park) – Senior citizens: intergenerational housing developments.
  • SB 728 by Senator Robert Hertzberg (D-Van Nuys) – Density Bonus Law: purchase of density bonus units by nonprofit housing organizations.
  • SB 791 by Senator Dave Cortese (D-San Jose) – California Surplus Land Unit.

The Governor previously signed:

  • AB 1174 by Assemblymember Tim Grayson (D-Concord) – Planning and zoning: housing: development application modifications, approvals, and subsequent permits.
  • SB 8 by Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) – Housing Crisis Act of 2019.
  • SB 9 by Senator Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego) – Housing development: approvals.
  • SB 10 by Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) – Planning and zoning: housing development: density.

Every city and county in California is obligated by law to plan and zone for their fair share of housing – a process currently underway. All told, local governments will need to plan for the creation of more than 2.5 million units statewide – more than doubling their obligation under the previous Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) cycle.

Today’s package of legislation, combined with unprecedented new state subsidies for affordable housing, enable local governments to meet these goals. To ensure that local leaders fulfill their legal responsibility to plan and zone for their share of the state’s housing needs, Governor Newsom announced the launch of California’s new Housing Accountability Unit (HAU) at the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). The new HAU will work with local municipalities to provide technical assistance to jurisdictions to aid their efforts to comply with state legislation mandating housing creation, including zoning and permitting. The HAU will also be empowered to take escalating enforcement steps to bring municipalities into compliance with their RHNA goals in the event of persistent non-compliance.

“It is absolutely imperative to meet these housing goals if we are serious about building an equitable future,” said Governor Newsom. “And it is similarly imperative to meet these housing targets because unaffordable housing leads to hours-long car commutes – directly inhibiting our efforts to meet our climate goals. Creating denser housing closer to major employment hubs is critical to limiting California’s greenhouse gas emissions.”

As part of the $22 billion California Comeback Plan investment for housing and homelessness, the Governor today announced the launch of a $100 million grant program for low- to moderate-income homeowners to build accessory dwelling units on their property, one of the latest efforts to ease the affordable housing shortage in the state. The California Housing Finance Agency’s (CalHFA) ADU Financing Program will provide as much as $25,000 in assistance to income-qualified homeowners, which is expected to produce 4,000 units of housing throughout the state. This funding will make a significant difference in ADU creation as upfront costs are often the biggest challenge for homeowners looking to build an ADU on their owner-occupied property.

The state is also taking action to address the interrelated problems of climate change and housing affordability with programs to transform neighborhoods into transit-oriented, affordable communities with a focus on limiting California’s greenhouse gas emissions.

The Governor today announced that the Administration has nearly doubled the funding available in the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities (AHSC) program for projects promoting dense, transit-oriented development. The California Strategic Growth Council took action to increase available funding for the current award round from $405 million to $785 million by accelerating funds that were planned for future award rounds. The AHSC program has invested over $1.1 billion across the state through 104 sustainable projects, creating over 9,000 affordable units and reducing 2.13 million tonnes of emissions over the projects’ operating lives.

In addition, the Governor signed legislation last week to add $420 million over three years to support the Strategic Growth Council’s Transformative Climate Communities Program, which provides large community-scale grants to transform low-income neighborhoods into transit-oriented, complete, affordable communities with a focus on greenhouse gas reduction.

Taken together, the AHSC acceleration and new TCC funding equal $800 million in new or accelerated funding to build affordable, climate-friendly housing and infrastructure in California.

In the coming days, the Governor will sign a package of bills to continue to confront California’s homelessness crisis – one of the most persistent challenges facing the state.

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Bank of America Fights the Housing Crisis With a $40,000 Grant to Build More Affordable Housing

As one of our strongest partners in the battle to provide affordable housing in the San Gabriel Valley, Bank of America has given $40,000 to support Habitat’s mission  in the San Gabriel Valley.

This grant comes at a time when the housing crisis in California has never been worse – with over 3 million units of housing required to satisfy resident needs. Coupled with the cost of living, this forces 1 in 5 families in the state to pay well over 50% of their income in housing costs alone – leaving them to choose between paying for the roof over their heads and other essentials, like medical care, nutrition, and transportation.

Bank of America’s commitment to alleviate the housing crisis through affordable homeownership is a long-lasting relationship that brings much needed funds to the organization. In addition, Bank of America  team members regularly  participate as Habitat volunteers – creating a deep personal connection to not only the homes they help build, but the communities they improve.

“There is no doubt the pandemic impacted affordable housing in our Los Angeles communities, exacerbating underlying economic and social disparities that already existed. Supporting the nonprofit sector as it continues to experience unprecedented demand to help vulnerable populations is more important than ever,” said Christine Bogharian, Global Risk Testing Executive, Bank of America.  “Our long-time partnership with Habitat in the San Gabriel Valley is one way Bank of America is helping to advance economic progress for local families through homeownership.”

Our more than 10-year partnership is a perfect example of how organizations can impact the communities they serve through philanthropy and volunteer efforts. Thanks to Bank of America, more families will be able to achieve their own American Dream through the power of homeownership.

Is your organization interested in a partnership that helps strengthen the communities you serve? Contact Leah Schueler, Corporate and Foundation Partnerships Manager.

Habitat for Humanity surveys homes amid destruction left by deadly earthquake in Haiti

LES CAYES, Haiti (Aug. 17, 2021) ─ Habitat for Humanity crews have fanned out in Haiti’s southwestern peninsula to survey homes in the wake of a powerful earthquake that has killed at least 1,297 people and caused thousands of structures to the crumble to the ground.

The death toll and the number of people injured – estimated at 5,700 as of late Monday – are expected to rise as emergency teams continue to go through the rubble left by the magnitude 7.2 earthquake, which leveled homes, churches and schools in cities such as Les Cayes, Jeremie and Anse à Veaux.

Officials have documented more than 12,000 homes destroyed or damaged so far, but Habitat expects this figure to rise significantly as more areas are surveyed.

“Our teams have started surveying neighborhoods in the affected areas to help assess damage to homes, in coordination with the government and other humanitarian agencies,” said Jean Frenel Tham, national director of Habitat for Humanity Haiti. “Unfortunately, these structures – many with large openings on the ground floor, little or no reinforcements, and low-quality materials – often suffer serious damage in earthquakes. And, as we saw for far too many families on Saturday, they can collapse entirely.”

Search and rescue crews continue to extract people trapped under rubble, and hospitals are struggling to cope with the surge of injured people. Because of frequent aftershocks, many frightened residents are choosing to sleep outside. Heavy rains associated with Tropical Depression Grace late Monday and into Tuesday, meanwhile, complicated relief and recovery efforts.

“Tragically, thousands of Haitians are once again faced with rebuilding their lives and their homes,” said Ernesto Castro Garcia, Habitat’s vice president for Latin America and the Caribbean. “We at Habitat are committed to being with them every step of the way. Our priority right now is to complete a thorough assessment of shelter needs in the impacted area and develop response options for the early recovery and reconstruction phases.”

Habitat for Humanity, which began working in Haiti in 1984, has forged strong partnerships with communities in Haiti’s southwest peninsula. Habitat worked with families to complete about 1,200 homes in response to Hurricane Matthew, which hit in 2016. Habitat continues to support construction of affordable housing, including for elderly residents in the area, while also building latrines and water points. Unrestricted tithe funds from San Gabriel Valley Habitat for Humanity donations have supported efforts in Haiti for many years.

3 Reasons Affordable Housing Creates a Better World 

A house is not just a house, it is a home – a place that shelters, protects, and nurturesIt offers a safe space for the people inside to thrive and supports their personal and professional development. 

We believe affordable housing is not a hand out. It’s a hand up. It gives families’ the ability to reimagine their future without the high cost of rent.  

In San Gabriel Valley, the need for affordable housing is apparent. The cost to rent or purchase housing has become less affordable for millions of Californians. What needs to be known is the impact affordable housing can make to families and the community. 

Affordable Housing is Great for Kids 

Stable, affordable housing is important for children’s future. A study done by Boston College and the MacArthur Foundation detailed how poor quality housing is tied to children’s emotional and behavioral problems.  

The National Low Income Housing Coalition reported poor housing quality and residential instability are the strongest predictions of behavioral problems among low-income children.  

Addressing housing affordability is the most cost-effective way of lifting people out of poverty, for reducing childhood poverty and increasing economic mobility, says Sarah Mickelson, senior director of public policy at the National Low Income Housing Coalition.” 

For children, a stable place to call home gives them an adequate space to study and the possibility to make a better future for themselves. With a room for a small desk and parent’s ability to spend more time with their children – all of these benefits can lead to a happier and healthier family. 

It Builds Sustainable Communities 

The need for affordable housing is imperative, not only for families who rely on housing, but neighborhoods. Having affordable housing developments in neighborhoods bring a positive impact on the surrounding communities. SGV Habitat works with city governments, housing organizations, and community advocates to create communities for families to thrive in.  

Studies have shown affordable housing uplifts residents, encourages social connection, reduces overcrowding, increases adjacent property values, attracts businesses and jobs, and lowers crime rates. 

There are many economic benefits of affordable housing. From increased spending, increased hiring, and increased taxes and revenue for local governments, affordable housing can help communities thrive as well. When families worry less about making rent, those living in affordable housing can spend more on more nutritious food and other essential items. Increasing the buying power for low-income families can mean steady income for local businesses, more job creations, and economic growth. This is proven as more and more shops, restaurants and healthcare facilities open where the NHP Foundation has properties. 

Promotes Diversity 

Affordable housing developments encourage diversity by creating communities where people of different cultural, socio-economic, and educational backgrounds can unite. Diverse communities increase the knowledge of cultural sensitivity, fairness, and understanding of different backgrounds – ultimately creating a better community overall.  

“Community-building investments that help neighbors from diverse backgrounds overcome their fears and suspicions and build positive social relationships across racial and ethnic lines may also help strengthen and stabilize newly diversifying neighborhoods and enable residents to enjoy the potential benefits,” according to a study by the Urban Institute. 

By supporting affordable housing in your community, you will be helping a family finally buy their first home, children being able to study in their own rooms, build a stronger and more vibrant community, and much more. 

How You Can Help 

  • Advocate for affordable housing for everyone 
  • Educate yourself on the benefits of affordable housing  
  • Help sustain and expand the Healthy Homesinitiatives at the federal, state and local levels, including public-private collaborative programs 
  • Strengthen enforcement of fair housing laws, including the Fair Housing Actand other state and local regulations prohibiting racial discrimination in housing markets 
  • Donate now to show your support to fix the housing crisis in the San Gabriel Valley and beyond 

Building the Beloved Community

Habitat for Humanity has a vision of a world where we share one humanity, and that’s a world that we believe in and fight for every day.

We are a faith-based organization, but we realize that faith must be coupled with works and action. As we share in the sadness, anger and uncertainty that have rocked communities across the United States — these protests of the systemic and racial injustice that have infused and informed the life of our nation — we recognize that we must do more.

We must create what Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. called “the Beloved Community” — a community that includes diversity and allows for tension undergirded by love and leading to transformation. To do so, we must truly love our neighbors as we love ourselves. We must change. And we must commit to tangible action.

We will do the work in our practices, our programs and our networks that brings equity to our efforts and helps bring justice to the communities in which we work. We will, throughout our ministry, connect issues of racial and social injustice with historic barriers to affordable housing and work to eradicate those barriers.

Historic discrimination in U.S. housing policy — particularly discrimination against Black Americans — is one of the chief drivers of racial inequities that persist today. Organizations like ours that work on housing must understand that history and have it inform our work.

In the tradition of the radical inclusivity that infused our birthplace Koinonia Farm from its earliest days, the leaders of our ministry commit to creating an environment where humility, open communication, dialogue and listening become our standard. In addition to being a space where people of all races, all faiths and all backgrounds come together in common cause, we commit to being actively anti-racist and to affirming, through word and action, that black lives matter and that our communities and systems must further this fundamental truth. We will ensure that our work is infused with courage and accountability so that we make our strong commitment to equity and true community a reality.